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Grand Canyon-new

The Pueblo people consider the Grand Canyon a holy site, and its scenic beauty, with dramatic layers of colored rock, bright blue skies above, and the shimmering Colorado River below, is truly inspiring. Animal, plant, and geological wonders abound in this wild landscape. The immense canyon, 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide, and a mile deep, provides boundless opportunities for exploration and adventure.

Where

northwestern Arizona, accessible from Phoenix, Flagstaff, or Las Vegas, Nevada

What to do

The South Rim is open all year, while the North Rim is closed during the winter. Temperatures vary wildly throughout the year and in various parts of the canyon. Summer highs within the canyon commonly exceed 100 °F and winter temperatures sometimes fall below 0 °F along the canyon's rims.

When to go

The South Rim is open all year, while the North Rim is closed during the winter. Temperatures vary wildly throughout the year and in various parts of the canyon. Summer highs within the canyon commonly exceed 100 °F and winter temperatures sometimes fall below 0 °F along the canyon's rims.

where
northwestern Arizona, accessible from Phoenix, Flagstaff, or Las Vegas, Nevada
What to do
hiking, running, rafting, camping, backpacking, cycling, mule riding, wildlife viewing, helicopter sightseeing, skydiving, night sky watching, photography
When to go
The South Rim is open all year, while the North Rim is closed during the winter. Temperatures vary wildly throughout the year and in various parts of the canyon. Summer highs within the canyon commonly exceed 100 °F and winter temperatures sometimes fall below 0 °F along the canyon's rims.

Don’t miss

Hike rim to rim. If you’re fit enough for this trek, it’s an amazing way to challenge yourself and see the beauty and variety of the canyon. The route covers 24 miles and 6,000 feet of elevation at the North Rim and 4,500 feet at the South Rim. The fastest hikers can do it in 12-15 hours, but most people take a couple of days.

The Grand Canyon Village provides easy access to some of the best viewing points in the park. From there, you can take day hikes on the popular Bright Angel Trail or South Kaibab Trail. To get away from the crowds, plan a backcountry hike on one of the more than 400 miles of trails that lead into the canyon such as the Grandview, New Hance, or Hermit trails.

River trips down the mighty Colorado take you to hidden waterfalls and winding side canyons that are accessible only by water. Take a guided trip or plan your own expedition for up to 25 days. Camping on the river’s shores, you’ll fall asleep under a blanket of innumerable stars at night and wake up to the morning sun casting its warm glow across the multicolored canyon walls.

Try something different and take a mule ride into the canyon. On the South Rim, you can take a two-day round-trip ride to the Colorado River and stay overnight at Phantom Ranch. On the North Rim, you can take shorter mule rides along the rim or day trips into the canyon.

Walk out over the great abyss on the Grand Canyon Skywalk, a horseshoe-shaped, glass-bottomed walkway that extends almost 70 feet out over the canyon. The skywalk is located at Grand Canyon West on the Hualapai Reservation where you can also learn about the tribe’s history and the significance of the canyon for their culture,

Ride instead of drive! Bicycles and e-bikes are allowed on all paved and unpaved roads on the South Rim. Cyclists can explore approximately 13 miles of roads and trails that provide spectacular views along the rim of the canyon. If you get tired, you can load your bike on one of the park’s bicycle-friendly shuttle buses.

Insider tips

All overnight camping below the rim requires a backcountry permit from the Backcountry Office. The earliest a permit application is accepted is the first of the month, four months before your proposed start month.

If you plan to hike into the canyon, be prepared for extreme summer heat, winter cold, and elevation changes. In warm months each hiker should carry and drink about a gallon (4 liters) of water per day. While the climate is generally dry, late summer monsoons can bring dramatic, localized thunderstorms.

If you want to hike but don’t want to carry your stuff, mule outfitters at the South Rim can provide pack animal services for a fee.

The train is a great alternative to driving as a way to get to the Grand Canyon. The Grand Canyon Railway departs from Williams, Arizona, and takes you to the South Rim. You won't have to deal with entrance-line waits, busy summer traffic, and finding a parking place in the village.

The Grand Canyon National Park has some of the most pristine night skies on the planet and is certified as an International Dark Sky Park. Attend the bustling annual Star Party or enjoy a more peaceful, remote night view with your friends.

Don’t miss

Hike rim to rim. If you’re fit enough for this trek, it’s an amazing way to challenge yourself and see the beauty and variety of the canyon. The route covers 24 miles and 6,000 feet of elevation at the North Rim and 4,500 feet at the South Rim. The fastest hikers can do it in 12-15 hours, but most people take a couple of days.

The Grand Canyon Village provides easy access to some of the best viewing points in the park. From there, you can take day hikes on the popular Bright Angel Trail or South Kaibab Trail. To get away from the crowds, plan a backcountry hike on one of the more than 400 miles of trails that lead into the canyon such as the Grandview, New Hance, or Hermit trails.

River trips down the mighty Colorado take you to hidden waterfalls and winding side canyons that are accessible only by water. Take a guided trip or plan your own expedition for up to 25 days. Camping on the river’s shores, you’ll fall asleep under a blanket of innumerable stars at night and wake up to the morning sun casting its warm glow across the multicolored canyon walls.

Try something different and take a mule ride into the canyon. On the South Rim, you can take a two-day round-trip ride to the Colorado River and stay overnight at Phantom Ranch. On the North Rim, you can take shorter mule rides along the rim or day trips into the canyon.

Walk out over the great abyss on the Grand Canyon Skywalk, a horseshoe-shaped, glass-bottomed walkway that extends almost 70 feet out over the canyon. The skywalk is located at Grand Canyon West on the Hualapai Reservation where you can also learn about the tribe’s history and the significance of the canyon for their culture,

Ride instead of drive! Bicycles and e-bikes are allowed on all paved and unpaved roads on the South Rim. Cyclists can explore approximately 13 miles of roads and trails that provide spectacular views along the rim of the canyon. If you get tired, you can load your bike on one of the park’s bicycle-friendly shuttle buses.

Insider tips

All overnight camping below the rim requires a backcountry permit from the Backcountry Office. The earliest a permit application is accepted is the first of the month, four months before your proposed start month.

If you plan to hike into the canyon, be prepared for extreme summer heat, winter cold, and elevation changes. In warm months each hiker should carry and drink about a gallon (4 liters) of water per day. While the climate is generally dry, late summer monsoons can bring dramatic, localized thunderstorms.

If you want to hike but don’t want to carry your stuff, mule outfitters at the South Rim can provide pack animal services for a fee.

The train is a great alternative to driving as a way to get to the Grand Canyon. The Grand Canyon Railway departs from Williams, Arizona, and takes you to the South Rim. You won't have to deal with entrance-line waits, busy summer traffic, and finding a parking place in the village.

The Grand Canyon National Park has some of the most pristine night skies on the planet and is certified as an International Dark Sky Park. Attend the bustling annual Star Party or enjoy a more peaceful, remote night view with your friends.